Saturday, 26 August 2017



Sending across prayers and warm wishes to you and your family on this auspicious occasion. Happy Ganesh Chaturthi...







Warm Wishes And Regards,


iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic




   

Six health problems linked to bad oral hygiene


Are you one of those people that fall victim to laziness when it comes to oral hygiene? Maybe you've had a long, hard day and just don't feel like brushing your teeth before going to bed. Or perhaps you don't give it much thought, and before you know, you haven't brushed or flossed your teeth in days! If this sounds like you, be mindful in what you're about to read.

The mouth is one of the dirtiest areas of the body. It's been said that the mouth harbors more bacteria than there are people on this planet, but whether that is an accurate statement or not, the mouth does host an abundance of bacteria. What is known, however, is that not all bacteria are bad; bacteria are needed to sustain homeostasis, but when bacteria have time to cultivate in the mouth it can lead to problems like periodontitis, a serious gum disease.2 Gum disease can complicate an already existing health issue or may even bring on a new one. It also makes for an unsightly smile.
Elderly Man BrushingIt doesn't take long to visibly see when one's mouth lacks attention. In just a matter of days you're able to see yellow buildup of dental plaque from not brushing. And when poor oral hygiene continues, the plaque builds giving way to inflammation of the gum and eventually infection.
Oral Hygiene and General Health
In the not so distant past, oral hygiene was not considered a factor in one's overall general health, but today, science has proven there is a strong link between the two.
A poor oral hygiene regimen can be a bacterial breeding ground and when oral hygiene is neglected or ignored it will eventually cause periodontal disease. Bacterium associated with periodontitis can enter the bloodstream via bleeding gums which is what links the two together.4 Here are just a few medical conditions linked to poor oral hygiene:
  • Heart disease - Bacteria in the bloodstream can travel to the heart and lead to a heart attack.
  • Endocarditis - Bacteria may find its way to the inner linings of the heart and valves which in turn, create growth pockets of bacteria. These pockets cause inflammation and infection of the inner linings of the heart.
  • Stroke - There are a number of reasons why a stroke may occur - one of them is the narrowing of artery walls and another is blood clots. It is believed that oral bacteria may be a contributing factor to the arteries narrowing as well as blood clots easily forming because of the body's negative response to the bacteria in the bloodstream.
  • Inflammation - Inflamed gums and bleeding may cause systemic inflammation.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis - It is known that periodontal disease will worsen the pain already suffered by those inflicted with this auto immune disorder.
  • Lung Condition - Those already suffering from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and pneumonia may have their condition worsened due to an increase of bacteria in their lungs. 
Prevention
The best way to fight periodontal disease and health issues linked to oral bacteria is to have a good oral hygiene regimen. Removing plaque buildup is necessary to keeping your gums and teeth free from disease. Brush your teeth at least two times a day and floss regularly. If you're unsure of the correct technique to flossing, at your next visit to your dentist have them show you the correct procedure to flossing your teeth. Moreover, it's crucial that see your dentist regularly (once or twice a year) for your checkups and cleanings. If you find you're having dental problems, do not hesitate to make an appointment with your dentist to prevent further, more severe health complications.
Brushing and flossing is the best prevention to a healthy mouth!

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Tuesday, 22 August 2017

Celebrating Birthday's...



Wishing Dr. Snehal A Splendid Year Ahead...Cheers!




Warm Wishes And Regards,

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Why Cats And Dogs Don't Need Braces.


Nature usually does a good job while making bodies. From Face to feet, we are roughly symmetrical. So are other animals. Unlike other animals, though, it is quite common for human beings to not have symmetrical teeth. Our teeth jut backword and forward and sideways to the delight of orthodontists.        Why are we the only animals to have malformed teeth? "The short answer is not that our teeth are too large, but that our jaws are too small to fit them in," writes Peter Ungar, a dental anthropologist at University of Arkansas.        While working with the foraging, Hadza tribe in Tanzania, Ungar found that they had perfect teeth. "They have got a lot of teeth. Most have 20 back teeth, whereas the rest of us tend to have 16 erupted and working. Hadza also typically have a tip-to-tip bite between the upper and lower front teeth; and the edges of their lowers align to form a perfect, flawless arch."         The size of teeth depends on genetics,but that of the jaw, Ungar says, is also determined by environment. In 2004, Harvard evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman showed that the ultimate length of a jaw depends on the stress put on it during chewing. "Our teeth don't fit because they evolved instead to match the longer jaw that would develop in a more challenging strain environment. Ours are too short because we don't give them the workout nature expects us to."             Our best hope to have properly aligned teeth, then, is to eat some tough food right from childhood. Chewing cane and biting into core on the cob is definitely healthier than slurping down cornflakes.  


iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Wednesday, 26 July 2017




Putting a cap on toothbrush is actually more detrimental. The moisture entrapped in he cap favors bacterial work.







iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Eight top tips for terrific teeth



1. Visit the dentist regularly, as often as they recommend

It doesn't matter how old you are, or how many teeth you have, you should always follow your dentist's advice about how often they need to see you. 

So why are check-ups so important? Well, for starters prevention is always better than cure. Regular visits to the dentist can identify problems developing early, and more importantly set you on a path to rectify them. 

There's a chance everyone will suffer from gum disease at some point in their lives - it's that common - so do remember to get to your dentist or hygienist as often as they recommend.

2. Take diet into consideration


Diet may have a large impact on the growing obesity problem in the UK, but there's no escaping the damage a poor diet does to our teeth.
One of the key messages is ‘cut down how often you have sugary foods and drinks'. This is a particularly important message for parents to remember. The more often your child has sugary or acidic foods or drinks, the more likely they are to have decay. It is therefore important to keep sugary and acidic foods to mealtimes only. Food and drinks which are kindest to teeth include cheese, crackers, breadsticks, raw vegetables, plain water and milk.

It is also worth remembering that some processed baby foods contain quite a lot of sugar. Try checking the list of ingredients - the higher up the list sugar is, the more there is in the product. Sometimes, these are shown as fructose, glucose, lactose, or sucrose.

3. Brush your teeth for two minutes twice a day using a fluoride toothpaste

It's important to brush your teeth first thing in the morning and just before you go to bed for two minutes using a fluoride toothpaste. Why? During the night the flow of saliva, which is the mouth's cleaning system, slows down. This leaves the mouth more at risk to decay; therefore brushing acts as a preventive measure.

Fluoride is an incredibly important addition to the toothpaste we use. It's also found in drinking water across the country. There are different levels depending on how old you are. All children up to three years old should use a toothpaste with a fluoride level of at least 1000ppm (parts per million). After three years old, it is recommended you use a toothpaste that contains 1350ppm-1500ppm. If you're unsure how much fluoride is on a particular brand, check the packaging for reassurance.

4. Indulge in interdental cleaning

As brushing alone only cleans around two thirds of the mouth, it is important to use interdental brushes or floss to clean away any food debris caught between the teeth. It can help to reduce the risk of gum disease. Given that gum disease has been linked to heart problems, pneumonia and even pancreatic cancer to name but a few, interdental cleaning at least once a day isn't too much to ask!

5. Get empowered with a power toothbrush

Rigorous tests have proven electric toothbrushes with small round oscillating rotating heads to be up to twice as effective at removing plaque than a manual brush. Many also have two minute timers to ensure you clean for the recommended period of time. Some such as the Oral B Triumph with Smart Guide also have a remote display to help your brush for the correct time and sensors to show you when you are brushing too hard. Look for the British Dental Health Foundation accredited logo which shows that the claims the product is making have been scientifically proven.

6. Remember the one hour rule


It takes an average of 40 minutes for the mouth to neutralise the acid caused by eating or drinking sugar. Therefore it is best to wait at least one hour after eating before brushing teeth. Eating or drinking weakens the enamel on the teeth, meaning if you brush too soon it cause tiny particles of the enamel to be brushed away. You can help to speed up the time that is takes for the saliva to neutralise these plaque acids and lessen the damage that they can cause by chewing sugar-free gum containing Xylitol, rinsing with a fluoride mouthrinse or plain water.

7. Teeth are not tools!


Although you can't legislate for genuine accidents, please remember your teeth aren't tools. If your party trick is to open a bottle of beer with your teeth, or if you're always biting open the crisp packet, you're actually doing your teeth more harm than good.

If you somehow lose a tooth, the important thing to remember is not to panic. Get to the emergency dentist as soon as possible, as with the right care, the tooth could be successfully put back into the socket. Ideally you should try and put it back in straight away, without handling the root.
The best chance of having your tooth successfully put back in is to keep the tooth in the cheek. If this isn't possible, keep it in some milk until you receive the necessary emergency dental work. The sooner you can do this the better.

8. Think about appearance

If you have a great oral hygiene routine, or even if you don't, there's no reason why you can't think about some cosmetic treatment to help brighten or restore your smile. People who smoke, drink red wine and lots of coffee may find over time their teeth become stained. There are toothpastes available that can remove these stains, but they won't alter the natural shade of your teeth. It's always best to have a good chat with the dentist about the options, which can include tooth whitening, crowns or veneers.

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Wednesday, 7 June 2017


This is why we change our toothbrushes after a certain period of time.










iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com