Thursday, 14 December 2017

What Is Scaling?              

Dental scaling is routinely performed to help patients with gum disease and excessive plaque buildup. While a standard cleaning will address the surface of the tooth, scaling goes much deeper. If there is a dental scaling and root planing suggested for your teeth, it’s helpful to know what this means so you can prepare for what’s ahead.

Understanding Scaling

Scaling is a common dental procedure for patients with gum disease. This is a type of dental cleaning that reaches below the gumline to remove plaque buildup. The process of scaling and root planing the teeth is often referred to as a deep cleaning. This treatment goes beyond the general cleaning that you receive with your regular checkup and annual visit.

When Is Dental Scaling Necessary?

Everyone experiences some form of plaque buildup. The saliva, bacteria, and proteins in your mouth form a thin layer that covers your teeth at almost all times. When you eat, tiny particles, acids, and sugars from the food stick to this film, creating a buildup on the teeth known as plaque. The bacteria that lives in this plaque can cause gum disease and tooth decay. Brushing, flossing, and regular dental cleanings will help remove the plaque and prevent more serious problems.
If you have healthy gums, the tissue will fit tightly around the tooth and keep plaque out. However, if gum disease begins to form, this tissue will loosen. Healthy gums attach to the tooth just 1 to 3 millimeters below the gumline. With gum disease, you’ll begin to develop deeper pockets. These can fill with plaque, worsening your problems and causing symptoms like bad breath.
If you have pockets of 4 millimeters or more, your dentist will probably recommend dental scaling to remove the plaque beneath the gumline and help treat the gum disease.

Scaling and Root Planing Procedures

Dental scaling involves the careful removal of plaque bacteria from the tooth’s surface just below the gumline. There are two basic methods for scaling teeth. If handheld instruments are used, dental plaque will be scrapped from the tooth using a metal tool known as a dental scaler and curette. This thin tool will be inserted beneath the gum line to access plaque your toothbrush can’t reach.
Alternately, an ultrasonic instrument is ideally choosen to scale your teeth. This features a vibrating metal tip combined with a cool water spray. The tip chips tartar away as the water flushes out the pocket.
Dental scaling is typically followed by a procedure known as root planing. Root planing reaches deeper to address the surface of the tooth’s root. This is done in the same manner as scaling. Root planing smooths the surface of the root so the gums can reattach properly.

What Does Scaling Feel Like?

Dental scaling can be uncomfortable, particularly if you have sensitive gums. A local anesthetic might be offered to numb your gum tissue and make the procedure more comfortable. Speak with the dentist about your options for desensitizing the area if you’re concerned about pain or discomfort during the process is suggested.
Dental scaling can take several visits, each one addressing a different portion of the mouth. Sometimes we divide the mouth into four quadrants, while in others we perform dental scaling in two halves. If you’re nervous about the process, you can schedule your scaling for a single visit. Though this isn’t an option for all cases, it may be available if you have only moderate gum disease and are willing to sit for a lengthy procedure.

What to Expect Afterwards

Your mouth may feel sore and sensitive after your dental scaling and root planing. Some patients experience swelling or bleeding for a few days following the procedure. A desensitizing toothpaste to help ease this discomfort is recommended. You might get a prescription mouthwash to use after the procedure, as well, to help keep the gums clean. It’s crucial that you use proper brushing and flossing procedures after your scaling to stop plaque from forming again in the same areas.
A second visit after your dental scaling to examine the gums, measure the depth of your gum pockets, and to  make sure your mouth is healing properly is suggested. If the gum pockets have gotten deeper since your scaling, you may need to explore additional treatment options to help you maintain a healthy smile.
Dental scaling is a very common treatment for patients with gum disease. Almost half of the population has gum disease, so you’re not alone if your dentist recommends this procedure. Scheduling dental scaling as needed can help you battle unseen plaque and maintain a cleaner mouth. If it is indicated that you need a deep cleaning, don’t hesitate to schedule this appointment. The result is a fresher smile that you’re sure to enjoy.

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

A deadly cocktail - tobacco and alcohol


Through many years of publicity and awareness-raising, we all know that smoking and drinking are bad for us. Yet, despite the known dangers, both practices continue to hold high popularity. In this article, we discuss the impact smoking and drinking has on our mouths and what this could mean for our overall health too.
There is a growing body of evidence to suggest those of us who smoke and drink are three times more likely to suffer from severe gum disease. This may not seem like a serious health problem but it is the main cause of tooth loss in adults and has been linked to a raft of systemic diseases such as strokes, heart disease, diabetes, meningitis, pneumonia and mouth cancer.
With an estimated 85% of deaths in the UK being as a result of chronic disease, taking care of our oral health has never been more important.
Worryingly though, as a population, we seem to be drinking more and more these days and, with many so called 'social smokers' having a cigarette while they drink, the likelihood is that poor oral health and increased cases of chronic diseases will continue to rise until people are forced to take notice.
Even those who don't drink or are occasional drinkers are susceptible to health problems. Almost one in five of us that drink occasionally display signs of severe gum disease, a problem exasperated by smoking. Binge drinking, alcohol abuse and tobacco smoking have long been cause for concern for health experts, while putting financial strain on an already over-burdened health system.
Putting oral health at risk through tobacco and excessive alcohol use is becoming a particularly concerning problem in young people, with almost one in two 11 to 15 year olds consuming alcohol, and more than one in four admitting to smoking. We're in an especially troubling situation where young people now deem it acceptable to try smoking and drinking, creating a dangerous path for their lifestyle habits in future years.
Drinking alcohol to excess
The number of alcohol consumers has increased substantially over the last century. Around 40 million adults regularly consume alcoholic drinks and while many do so moderately. Alcohol increases the risk of a person developing gum disease, tooth decay, erosion and mouth cancer.
Those with alcohol abuse problems have been found to have a higher level of tooth decay, and more seriously, potentially pre-cancerous oral lesions.
To take responsibility for your health means to be aware of the issues and look after yourself. Many people enjoy alcohol but moderating your drinking is a must, so it is important that you are aware of the risks and are confident you are not hurting your health.
Mouth cancer is one of the fastest growing cancers and only of very few that is predicted to rise in the coming decade. One person every four hours current dies from mouth cancer, with around three in every four of all mouth cancer patients frequently consuming alcohol prior to diagnosis. People who drink more than the recommended units of alcohol per week and smoke more than one pack of cigarettes per day are up to 30 times more likely to develop mouth cancer.
Alcohol can also cause dental erosion, which is the loss of tooth enamel that protects the sensitive dentine underneath. Fizzy and acidic drinks and white wine are also more likely to cause damage. In the run up to the festive season many people over indulge in alcohol which can damage their teeth, but it is possible to protect them while still enjoying a few drinks:
  • Avoid fizzy drinks and fruit juice mixers.
  • Be aware that acidic drinks such as cider, white wine, champagne can cause dental erosion.
  • Avoid drinking more than the weekly recommended units of alcohol (14 units for women and 21 units for men).
  • Wait for an hour before brushing your teeth after you have had a fizzy and/or acidic drink.
  • Chew sugar-free gum after drinking to help produce more saliva to help cancel out the acids which form in your mouth after drinking.
Smoking and tobacco use
On average, smokers lose about 16 years of their life. And after decades of campaigning, it seems like the message is finally getting through. But despite the fall in numbers over the last few years, smoking remains a significant concern. It accounts for more than 1.6 million hospital admissions every year - a figure which, despite there being fewer smokers, is still rising.
Smoking can cause a variety of oral health problems including tooth staining, dental plaque, bad breath, tooth loss and gum disease. Staining on the teeth is due to the nicotine and tar in tobacco, which can make the teeth yellow in a very short time, and heavy smokers often complain that their teeth are almost brown after years of smoking. Smoking may also change the type of bacteria in dental plaque, increasing the number of bacteria that are more harmful. It also reduces the blood flow in the gums and supporting tissues of the tooth and makes them more likely to become inflamed. Smokers' gum disease will get worse more quickly than in people who do not smoke and because of the reduced blood flow smokers may not get the warning symptoms of bleeding gums as much as non-smokers.
Of more concern is the significant risk of developing life-threatening diseases such as lung disease and mouth cancer. More than one in four of us are still unaware that smoking is the leading cause of mouth cancer - attributing to more than three in every four cases.
In contrast to traditional cigarettes, cigar and pipe smoking and smokeless chewing tobacco, pose an equally dangerous threat, as do some of the newer trends such as e-cigarettes and sisha pipes. Not more so, because of their relatively low levels of awareness. More than half of us mistakenly think e-cigarettes and shisha pipes are safe alternatives to smoking while just under half believe smokeless tobacco is a safer substitute.
While it is encouraging to see the level of smokers fall, from an oral health aspect, it is clear we still have some way to go in order to eradicate habits detrimental to oral hygiene. More must be done to educate risk groups on the hazards that smoking and alcohol both pose. Together they act as a deadly cocktail that not only poses a danger to our mouth, but has a life-threatening impact on our general health.

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Wednesday, 8 November 2017




Dental implants and how crucial replacing teeth really is...


Before we get into the importance of replacing teeth, let's address the most common question first: what exactly is a dental implant anyway? A dental implant is a tiny, but extremely strong, titanium alloy screw which is used while surgically replacing damaged or missing natural teeth.  It is drilled into the jawbone, so that the screw can firmly connect the artificial teeth or any other dental prosthesis to the jaw.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         






In addition to its use in replacing broken/missing teeth, implants can also be used to provide support to loose, removable dentures. Now that you know what a dental implant is exactly, let's take a look at why replacing lost or badly damaged teeth is important in the first place.


Appearance

Superficial as it may sound to someone who has all their teeth, even a single missing tooth can put a lot of emotional stress on us. In varying degrees, we are all somewhat concerned about our appearance, and it affects our confidence as well.


To lose your perfect smile because of a missing tooth or two can cause depression and loss of confidence, which in turn may affect your work and personal life. It has been found that dental implants are often effective in boosting the patient's morale and overall confidence. Since there is no externally visible difference between a replaced tooth and a natural one after the procedure, it does actually affect physical appearance positively.

Oral Health
As soon as a tooth is lost, the balance in your entire dental structure is disturbed. The created gap allows for the remaining teeth (especially the ones nearest to the gap) to tilt and shift as a result of even the most normal regular chewing.

This could lead to further oral problems down the line, especially if the distorted structure of the teeth interferes with the patient's chewing abilities. It isn't uncommon to see someone lose multiple teeth over the years as a result of this and more often than not, the bone loss occurs in the same row, side by side.

The Comfort
If you have all your teeth intact, then you probably don't have any idea how it feels when a particularly hard piece of food comes in-between the exposed root of the missing molar and an existing one.

Let's just say that it isn't a very comfortable experience and once that keeps happening almost every time you try to eat, it's not rare to see people giving up on meat and other previously loved food sources to alleviate themselves from the continuous pain and discomfort. In a way, losing your ability to properly chew food can potentially stop you from enjoying a very big part of your life.


Dental prosthetics with the proper dental implant to support it can dramatically change the life of someone who is missing teeth.A lot depends on the skill of the dentist involved and it is a complex surgical procedure; so, it is best to not take any risks with this one. The good news is that dental implants have a success rate over 95%.

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Saturday, 26 August 2017



Sending across prayers and warm wishes to you and your family on this auspicious occasion. Happy Ganesh Chaturthi...







Warm Wishes And Regards,


iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic




   

Six health problems linked to bad oral hygiene


Are you one of those people that fall victim to laziness when it comes to oral hygiene? Maybe you've had a long, hard day and just don't feel like brushing your teeth before going to bed. Or perhaps you don't give it much thought, and before you know, you haven't brushed or flossed your teeth in days! If this sounds like you, be mindful in what you're about to read.

The mouth is one of the dirtiest areas of the body. It's been said that the mouth harbors more bacteria than there are people on this planet, but whether that is an accurate statement or not, the mouth does host an abundance of bacteria. What is known, however, is that not all bacteria are bad; bacteria are needed to sustain homeostasis, but when bacteria have time to cultivate in the mouth it can lead to problems like periodontitis, a serious gum disease.2 Gum disease can complicate an already existing health issue or may even bring on a new one. It also makes for an unsightly smile.
Elderly Man BrushingIt doesn't take long to visibly see when one's mouth lacks attention. In just a matter of days you're able to see yellow buildup of dental plaque from not brushing. And when poor oral hygiene continues, the plaque builds giving way to inflammation of the gum and eventually infection.
Oral Hygiene and General Health
In the not so distant past, oral hygiene was not considered a factor in one's overall general health, but today, science has proven there is a strong link between the two.
A poor oral hygiene regimen can be a bacterial breeding ground and when oral hygiene is neglected or ignored it will eventually cause periodontal disease. Bacterium associated with periodontitis can enter the bloodstream via bleeding gums which is what links the two together.4 Here are just a few medical conditions linked to poor oral hygiene:
  • Heart disease - Bacteria in the bloodstream can travel to the heart and lead to a heart attack.
  • Endocarditis - Bacteria may find its way to the inner linings of the heart and valves which in turn, create growth pockets of bacteria. These pockets cause inflammation and infection of the inner linings of the heart.
  • Stroke - There are a number of reasons why a stroke may occur - one of them is the narrowing of artery walls and another is blood clots. It is believed that oral bacteria may be a contributing factor to the arteries narrowing as well as blood clots easily forming because of the body's negative response to the bacteria in the bloodstream.
  • Inflammation - Inflamed gums and bleeding may cause systemic inflammation.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis - It is known that periodontal disease will worsen the pain already suffered by those inflicted with this auto immune disorder.
  • Lung Condition - Those already suffering from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and pneumonia may have their condition worsened due to an increase of bacteria in their lungs. 
Prevention
The best way to fight periodontal disease and health issues linked to oral bacteria is to have a good oral hygiene regimen. Removing plaque buildup is necessary to keeping your gums and teeth free from disease. Brush your teeth at least two times a day and floss regularly. If you're unsure of the correct technique to flossing, at your next visit to your dentist have them show you the correct procedure to flossing your teeth. Moreover, it's crucial that see your dentist regularly (once or twice a year) for your checkups and cleanings. If you find you're having dental problems, do not hesitate to make an appointment with your dentist to prevent further, more severe health complications.
Brushing and flossing is the best prevention to a healthy mouth!

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com

Tuesday, 22 August 2017

Celebrating Birthday's...



Wishing Dr. Snehal A Splendid Year Ahead...Cheers!




Warm Wishes And Regards,

iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Why Cats And Dogs Don't Need Braces.


Nature usually does a good job while making bodies. From Face to feet, we are roughly symmetrical. So are other animals. Unlike other animals, though, it is quite common for human beings to not have symmetrical teeth. Our teeth jut backword and forward and sideways to the delight of orthodontists.        Why are we the only animals to have malformed teeth? "The short answer is not that our teeth are too large, but that our jaws are too small to fit them in," writes Peter Ungar, a dental anthropologist at University of Arkansas.        While working with the foraging, Hadza tribe in Tanzania, Ungar found that they had perfect teeth. "They have got a lot of teeth. Most have 20 back teeth, whereas the rest of us tend to have 16 erupted and working. Hadza also typically have a tip-to-tip bite between the upper and lower front teeth; and the edges of their lowers align to form a perfect, flawless arch."         The size of teeth depends on genetics,but that of the jaw, Ungar says, is also determined by environment. In 2004, Harvard evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman showed that the ultimate length of a jaw depends on the stress put on it during chewing. "Our teeth don't fit because they evolved instead to match the longer jaw that would develop in a more challenging strain environment. Ours are too short because we don't give them the workout nature expects us to."             Our best hope to have properly aligned teeth, then, is to eat some tough food right from childhood. Chewing cane and biting into core on the cob is definitely healthier than slurping down cornflakes.  


iDent, Idyll Dental Clinic
To book an appointment with us:
Call us at: +912240147049/09321330133
Email: smileident@gmail.com
Website: www.smileident.com